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AI in College Admission

While+educators+are+concerned+about+student+use+of+AI%2C+its+also+being+used+the+other+way+around.+In+a+study+by+Intelligent.com+of+399+educational+institutions%2C+82%25+plan+to+use+AI+by+next+year+to+determine+whether+or+not+to+accept+a+student.+56%25+of+the+institutions+surveyed+said+they+are+already+using+AI+in+admissions.
Intelligent.com
While educators are concerned about student use of AI, it’s also being used the other way around. In a study by Intelligent.com of 399 educational institutions, 82% plan to use AI by next year to determine whether or not to accept a student. 56% of the institutions surveyed said they are already using AI in admissions.

Schools worried about AI being used for assignment help, but surveys found that educational institutions such as colleges have used AI for their respective admission processes. Professor Diane Gayeski is the Higher Education and Career Adviser for Intelligent.com.
“The Common App has made it easy for high school students to apply to multiple colleges by filling out one set of data,” Gayeski said. “This means colleges have an increasing number of applications to scan.”
A college application consisted of a student’s personal information, grades, GPA, as well as other educational info.
“There are many pieces to a college application, because it’s so complex,” Career Connect Counselor Liz Barnes said. “Most schools say they look at students…as a whole. It’s good for a student because there’s more to a person than just the books.”
According to a survey by Intelligent.com, 82% of educational institutions will use AI in admissions by 2024 with 56% already having used it. The survey said 71% used AI to scan transcripts, 73% for teacher recommendations and 60% to scan personal essays. In the survey 44% used AI to make the final decision, while 43% said “sometimes.”
“AI can now ‘read’ applications and use the same kinds of scoring systems, which makes… the system much more efficient,” Gayeski said. “Additionally, computer applications may be more… consistent and accurate than humans.”

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